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The UN R155 and UN R156 regulations are of vital importance for vehicle cybersecurity. From July 2022, all car manufacturers that want to be type-approved must comply with both regulations, but from July 2024 this requirement will be extended to all new vehicles sold in the European Union, regardless of when the manufacturer obtained type-approval. One of the most important aspects of compliance with both regulations is the completion of a cybersecurity risk assessment of the vehicle, including all integrated components of the vehicle's supply chain. On the other hand, it also specifies how to incorporate cybersecurity from design, how to detect and respond to incidents, how to securely update vehicle software, etc. 

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Blog posted on 02/05/2024

In the electricity sector, it has always been necessary to use robust communications that allow proper communication, since a failure in this sector would cause a large number of losses, both economic and social.

In addition, with the technological advances, it is important also to have secure communications since the electricity sector is one of the sectors that currently suffers the most cyber-attacks. For this reason, in recent years different robust and secure protocols have been created.

One of these protocols is DNP3, created mainly for the use of substation automation and control systems, for the electric utility industry, although it has now also been used for other sectors.

Finally, in this article we want to explain in more depth the operation of this protocol and the benefits or disadvantages of using this protocol.

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Blog posted on 18/04/2024

CAPEC (Common Attack Pattern Enumeration and Classification) is a project that focuses on enumerating and classifying common attack patterns on computer systems and providing a systematic approach to understanding and addressing the tactics used by attackers. Like CWE (Common Weakness Enumeration), CAPEC is an initiative of the computer security community and is maintained by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the United States. Recently in version 3.9, the project has incorporated a number of attack patterns related to the industrial world.

This article aims to show the reader the use of these codes, such as those used at the identifier level in CVEs, CWEs, etc., and which are related to many of the jobs that are carried out on a daily basis in the industrial cybersecurity sector.

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Second part of the Top 20 mitigations for industrial environments. This part will focus on mitigations related to network architecture, industrial protocols, network configuration and vulnerability scanning.

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In the industrial world, there are a large number of systems, equipment, networks, areas, ducts, cloud environments, IT-OT environments, etc. In recent years, the number of attacks on industrial environments has been growing exponentially, and not only on purely industrial environments, but also on corporate environments that are connected to industrial environments. These IT environments being access points for attackers due to this IT/OT connectivity.

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In recent decades, the need to control processes remotely to improve efficiency, productivity and accelerate decision making on industrial systems has led to the interconnection of operation technologies (OT) with information technologies (IT). This interconnection has given rise to a number of security risks in industrial control systems, and to meet these challenges, specific tools and technologies have been developed and adapted to help ensure cybersecurity in industrial environments. One such tool is the Security Operations Center (SOC).

In this article we will focus on the importance of advanced monitoring in a SOC OT.
 

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IDSs are passive elements that are in our network to ensure its security, but what would happen if all our communications were encrypted, or would this protection measure be enough to ensure that my network is protected? These questions and more will be discussed in the following article to provide solutions and advice focused on industrial environments.

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When talking about an endpoint device, we are talking about an end asset present at the network level. Among these devices we can find engineering stations (workstations), HMI, SCADA or PLC, among others.

 The evolution of industrial environments towards models in which these equipment are connected, both with corporate networks and remotely with suppliers, for maintenance purposes, exposes them to new threats. That is why industrial endpoints must be properly and individually protected and at multiple levels so that they cannot be compromised.   These end systems are key security hotspots because their vulnerabilities could affect other assets within the network.